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Agricultural entomology: Cotton cochineal of the olive tree

Classification and host plantsClass: InsectsOrder: RincotiSuborder: HomopteraFamily: Coccidia or LecanidesGender: LichtensiaSpecies: L. viburni Sign.Bibliographic reference: "Phytopathology, agricultural entomology and applied biology" - M.Ferrari, E.Marcon, A.Menta; School edagricole - RCS Libri spa Guest plants: Olivo, Lentisco, Mirto, Viburno, Edera.
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Agricultural entomology: Narcissus fly, Lampetia equestris

Classification and host plantsClass: InsectsOrder: DipteraSuborder: Brachiceri (Ciclorafi section) Family: SirphidaeGender: LampetiaSpecies: L. equestris F.Host plants: Narcissus, IrisIdentification and damageThe larvae feed on Narcissus bulbs. The larvae of this diptera infiltrate the bulb causing serious direct and indirect damage, (they facilitate the formation of mold and rot of the vital parts of the bulbs).
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Interesting

How to Take Care of Fortune Plants

Fortune plants, also sold as & 34;Lucky Bamboo& 34; plants, are rain-forest plants that do best in a base of either water and pebbles, or very well-drained and moist soil. Most commonly the plants found under the name fortune or good fortune plants are the small bamboo, with the scientific name dracaena sanderiana.
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Miscellaneous

How to Repair a Brownstone Stoop

Jupiterimages/Photos.com/Getty ImagesThinking of a brownstone stoop immediately evokes images of classic buildings in large cities such as New York, Boston or Philadelphia. A brownstone stoop was a gathering place for parents to sit with other parents to socialize while their children played nearby. In an urban setting, a small porch with attached stairs is commonly known as a stoop.
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How to Grow Herbs in Hawaii

Healthy basil image by Rebecca Capell from Fotolia.comMost herbs require full sun and well-drained soil to thrive. Hawaii& 39;s soils vary in structure, but all of them are volcanic in nature. However, before planting an herb garden in Hawaii, you must first test the soil for nutrient loss. Nutrients leech out of Hawaiian soils quickly due to the frequent rains.
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